Be Prepared.

Though each situation is unique, any organization can be better prepared if it plans carefully, puts emergency procedures in place, and practices for emergencies of all kinds. AGC Houston has provided helpful information for you and your company below.

Guidelines for Creation of Inclement Weather Preparedness Plan
The AGC Houston Safety Committee created this document to provide employers with tools and resources to support preparedness efforts.

Related Resources

City Of Houston Releases Guide To Disaster Assistance Services  
Mayor's Office of Public Safety and the Office of Emergency Management provide a guide with detailed information about the types of federal, state and local disaster-assistance services available, for all Houstonians impacted by the devastating effects of Hurricane Harvey.
 
OSHA Disaster Cleanup & Recovery PPE Matrix
Workers engaged in disaster cleanup and recovery activities may be exposed to a variety of hazards. A comprehensive list of potential hazards and controls, sorted by common tasks, can be found in OSHA's Hurricane eMatrix. Specialized operations, such as electrical power restoration, hazardous materials response, or confined space entry require controls specified in the applicable OSHA standards.
 
Ensuring Food Safety In The Aftermath Of A Natural Disaster
If any type of unexpected emergency strikes your community, you may not have access to fresh food, water or electricity for days, maybe weeks. The City of Houston Health Department has published  "Post Disaster Guidelines And Procedures" and offer additional resources related to food protection.

Worker Safety And Health Resources For Hurricane & Flood Cleanup  
OSHA has provided a safety and health resources guide to assist companies as workers help with flood cleanup and recovery. 
The information relates to:
  • Floods
  • Hurricanes
  • General Response & Recovery
  • PPE 
  • Heat
  • Fall Protection

Greater Houston Partnership Offers Insight To Hurricane Harvey’s Impact
Hurricane Harvey’s economic impact will be greater than Hurricane Ike’s, and it is estimated that the total losses will be around $90 billion. The Greater Houston Partnership has released statistical data related to the hurricane and reports on its affect now and in the months to come in their monthly newsletter, The Economy At A Glance .